Tag Archives: sed

sed oneliner

http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line.txt
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USEFUL ONE-LINE SCRIPTS FOR SED (Unix stream editor) Dec. 29, 2005
Compiled by Eric Pement – pemente[at]northpark[dot]edu version 5.5

Latest version of this file (in English) is usually at:
http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line.txt
http://www.pement.org/sed/sed1line.txt

This file will also available in other languages:
Chinese – http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line_zh-CN.html
Czech – http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line_cz.html
Dutch – http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line_nl.html
French – http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line_fr.html
German – http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line_de.html
Italian – (pending)
Portuguese – http://sed.sourceforge.net/sed1line_pt-BR.html
Spanish – (pending)

#ref. http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-sed2.html
#sed script that will remove HTML tags from a file
sed -e ‘s/]*>//g’ myfile.html
checking sed to remove lines with symbols 0123456789
# Rem blank lines and # comments

# Use following sed magic to remove both comments and empty lines at the same expense:

sed ‘/ *#/d; /^ *$/d’

#SED processes whatever you give it, and displays it on “STDOUT”—by default, your terminal window. It does not change filenames—that is done with the “mv” command.

#why “ls -d” ?

#I think you need something like this:
for filename in *; do newname= $(sed ‘s/+//g’ $filename); mv $filename $newname; done

To drill down in the directory tree, use “$(ls -R) instead of “*”

sed -e ‘/[^.][^,][^!][^”][^#][^$][^%][^&][^/][^(][^)][^=][^?][^¡][^¿][^’][^´][^+][^*][^¨][^{][^}][^]][^[][^-][^_][^:][^]][:blank:][:alnum:]/d’ /home/glenn/filename1
sed s -e ‘/[^\.][^\,][^\!][^\”][^\#][^\$][^\%][^\&][^\/][^\(][^\)][^\=][^\?][^\¡][^\¿][^\’][^\´][^\+][^\*][^\¨][^\{][^\}][^\]][^\[][^\-][^\_][^\:][^\]][:blank:][:alnum:]/d’ /home/glenn/filename1
sed -e ‘/[[:blank:]][[:alnum:]]/d’ /home/glenn/filename1
cat /home/glenn/filename1 | sed -d ‘/#\.\*\[\]\\\/\$\^\-\_\?/d’
cat /home/glenn/filename1 | sed -e ‘/#\*\[\]\\/d’
cat /home/glenn/filename1 | sed -e ‘/#\.\*\[\]\\\/\$\^\-\_\?/d’

FILE SPACING:

# double space a file
sed G

# double space a file which already has blank lines in it. Output file
# should contain no more than one blank line between lines of text.
sed ‘/^$/d;G’

# triple space a file
sed ‘G;G’

# undo double-spacing (assumes even-numbered lines are always blank)
sed ‘n;d’

# insert a blank line above every line which matches “regex”
sed ‘/regex/{x;p;x;}’

# insert a blank line below every line which matches “regex”
sed ‘/regex/G’

# insert a blank line above and below every line which matches “regex”
sed ‘/regex/{x;p;x;G;}’

NUMBERING:

# number each line of a file (simple left alignment). Using a tab (see
# note on ‘\t’ at end of file) instead of space will preserve margins.
sed = filename | sed ‘N;s/\n/\t/’

# number each line of a file (number on left, right-aligned)
sed = filename | sed ‘N; s/^/ /; s/ *\(.\{6,\}\)\n/\1 /’

# number each line of file, but only print numbers if line is not blank
sed ‘/./=’ filename | sed ‘/./N; s/\n/ /’

# count lines (emulates “wc -l”)
sed -n ‘$=’

TEXT CONVERSION AND SUBSTITUTION:

# IN UNIX ENVIRONMENT: convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format.
sed ‘s/.$//’ # assumes that all lines end with CR/LF
sed ‘s/^M$//’ # in bash/tcsh, press Ctrl-V then Ctrl-M
sed ‘s/\x0D$//’ # works on ssed, gsed 3.02.80 or higher

# IN UNIX ENVIRONMENT: convert Unix newlines (LF) to DOS format.
sed “s/$/`echo -e \\\r`/” # command line under ksh
sed ‘s/$'”/`echo \\\r`/” # command line under bash
sed “s/$/`echo \\\r`/” # command line under zsh
sed ‘s/$/\r/’ # gsed 3.02.80 or higher

# IN DOS ENVIRONMENT: convert Unix newlines (LF) to DOS format.
sed “s/$//” # method 1
sed -n p # method 2

# IN DOS ENVIRONMENT: convert DOS newlines (CR/LF) to Unix format.
# Can only be done with UnxUtils sed, version 4.0.7 or higher. The
# UnxUtils version can be identified by the custom “–text” switch
# which appears when you use the “–help” switch. Otherwise, changing
# DOS newlines to Unix newlines cannot be done with sed in a DOS
# environment. Use “tr” instead.
sed “s/\r//” infile >outfile # UnxUtils sed v4.0.7 or higher
tr -d \r <infile >outfile # GNU tr version 1.22 or higher

# delete leading whitespace (spaces, tabs) from front of each line
# aligns all text flush left
sed ‘s/^[ \t]*//’ # see note on ‘\t’ at end of file

# delete trailing whitespace (spaces, tabs) from end of each line
sed ‘s/[ \t]*$//’ # see note on ‘\t’ at end of file

# delete BOTH leading and trailing whitespace from each line
sed ‘s/^[ \t]*//;s/[ \t]*$//’

# insert 5 blank spaces at beginning of each line (make page offset)
sed ‘s/^/ /’

# align all text flush right on a 79-column width
sed -e :a -e ‘s/^.\{1,78\}$/ &/;ta’ # set at 78 plus 1 space

# center all text in the middle of 79-column width. In method 1,
# spaces at the beginning of the line are significant, and trailing
# spaces are appended at the end of the line. In method 2, spaces at
# the beginning of the line are discarded in centering the line, and
# no trailing spaces appear at the end of lines.
sed -e :a -e ‘s/^.\{1,77\}$/ & /;ta’ # method 1
sed -e :a -e ‘s/^.\{1,77\}$/ &/;ta’ -e ‘s/\( *\)\1/\1/’ # method 2

# substitute (find and replace) “foo” with “bar” on each line
sed ‘s/foo/bar/’ # replaces only 1st instance in a line
sed ‘s/foo/bar/4’ # replaces only 4th instance in a line
sed ‘s/foo/bar/g’ # replaces ALL instances in a line
sed ‘s/\(.*\)foo\(.*foo\)/\1bar\2/’ # replace the next-to-last case
sed ‘s/\(.*\)foo/\1bar/’ # replace only the last case

# substitute “foo” with “bar” ONLY for lines which contain “baz”
sed ‘/baz/s/foo/bar/g’

# substitute “foo” with “bar” EXCEPT for lines which contain “baz”
sed ‘/baz/!s/foo/bar/g’

# change “scarlet” or “ruby” or “puce” to “red”
sed ‘s/scarlet/red/g;s/ruby/red/g;s/puce/red/g’ # most seds
gsed ‘s/scarlet\|ruby\|puce/red/g’ # GNU sed only

# reverse order of lines (emulates “tac”)
# bug/feature in HHsed v1.5 causes blank lines to be deleted
sed ‘1!G;h;$!d’ # method 1
sed -n ‘1!G;h;$p’ # method 2

# reverse each character on the line (emulates “rev”)
sed ‘/\n/!G;s/\(.\)\(.*\n\)/&\2\1/;//D;s/.//’

# join pairs of lines side-by-side (like “paste”)
sed ‘$!N;s/\n/ /’

# if a line ends with a backslash, append the next line to it
sed -e :a -e ‘/\\$/N; s/\\\n//; ta’